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Mets Season Will Have No Miracle

The Mets had a shot at pulling off the impossible because the schedules presented the opportunity. For the Mets, they just needed to beat up on the Marlins.

Instead, we got a game full of Tom Glavine, Dontrelle Willis, Scott Schoeneweis, Wes Helms, and well, you get the idea.

The Mets moved Steven Matz to tonight because he was better at home than the road. That was true until tonight.

Jorge Alfaro homered in the second. Jon Berti doubled in the third, and he scored on a Miguel Rojas RBI single. That was an inning after Berti robbed Michael Conforto of a homer (or an extra base hit).

Matz put up some zeros as Caleb Smith shut down the Mets offense. Part of that was getting Todd Frazier out in big spots. He got Frazier out with the bases loaded and two outs in the first, and he then got him with runners at first and second with two outs in the third.

Then a crazy sixth inning happened. You could see it was nearing the end of the line for Matz, and then he loaded the bases. Rather than go to the bullpen, Mickey Callaway stuck with Matz for one batter too many.

When Alfaro hit his grand slam, it looked like the Mets were dead in the water.

That’s when this Mets team once again showed us the character they have. The Mets loaded the bases with two outs in the sixth, and Amed Rosario would hit his second career grand slam to make it a game again:

At 6-4, it was a brand new game. That’s what made the seventh inning so crushing.

For some reason, it was Walker Lockett to start the seventh. Perhaps, the reason was the other options were equally as uninspiring or being saved for a little later, but the overriding point is, Lockett was actually an option, and he was used.

Curtis Granderson walked to lead off the inning, and Berti got another hit. That prompted Callaway to go to Brad Brach. What makes this game all the more infuriating was Brach should’ve gotten out of the inning.

Brach got two outs before intentionally walking Alfaro to face Harold Ramirez. Ramirez grounded it to first, and he was initially ruled out. He wasn’t.

Brach started late and got there late. As a result, not only was Ramirez ruled safe, but two runs would score.

Yes, two. Apparently, because Berti was running hard, he was allowed to score on a play Brach could’ve thrown home but didn’t because of the wrong call by the first base umpire.

The Mets were down 8-4. They had a chance to score in the bottom of the seventh, but Conforto struck out against the tough LOOGY Brian Moran to end the inning.

The Mets did little to nothing in the eighth and ninth. There was not another miracle run. Not in this game, and apparently not in this season. Once again it was the Marlins the final week of the season, and it came not too long after Christian Colon delivered his own death blow.

In the end, it’s all just salt being rubbed in the wound.

0 thoughts on “Mets Season Will Have No Miracle”

  1. Blair M. Schirmer says:

    “The Mets moved Steven Matz to tonight because he was better at home than the road. That was true until tonight.”

    —Or were saying so to spare his feelings while keeping a better pitcher on 4 days rest.

    “For some reason, it was Walker Lockett to start the seventh. Perhaps, the reason was the other options were equally as uninspiring or being saved for a little later, but the overriding point is, Lockett was actually an option, and he was used.”

    —I was just looking at the box score and noticed that in the game the Marlins used 5 pitchers, 4 of whom had ERAs under 4.35.
    The Mets used 7 pitchers, NONE of whom had ERAs under 4.35.
    That sums up the season pretty well.

    “Then a crazy sixth inning happened. You could see it was nearing the end of the line for Matz, and then he loaded the bases. Rather than go to the bullpen, Mickey Callaway stuck with Matz for one batter too many.”

    —While I would agree Matz looked done, he had only throw about 75 pitches before Alfaro stung him again, and every one of Callaway’s options for this game–every one of the six pitchers Callaway turned to out of the pen tonight–has a worse ERA than Matz. Every single one. Doesn’t mean you don’t go to a fresh arm at a critical juncture, and it doesn’t mean Callaway isn’t at fault for not getting better results from his bullpen arms during the season, but that’s an awful choice right there.

    1. metsdaddy says:

      Tonight was a bad mix of poor decisions made by a manager who had poorer options at his disposal.

  2. David Klein says:

    The more you realize Matz is a fifth starter and nothing more You’ll get slightly less frustrated with him as all the injuries knocked much the upside out of him and he is what he is, and hey he’s having a better year than he did in 2017 or 2018. Todd Frazier had a big hand in Saturday’s loss, and had an even bigger hand in today’s loss leaving half an army on base but he’ll probably play over Davis tomorrow I’m sure despite no longer having the ability to hit righties. Oh and Brach was ready to pitch the seventh which made using Lockett more egregious

    1. metsdaddy says:

      I think Matz is anywhere from a 3-5, and Frazier did play a role in both losses. Unfortunately, the same can be made about other players on this roster, but people won’t point the fingers at them because Frazier is where all the negative attention goes.

    2. Blair M. Schirmer says:

      @David Klein Couldn’t agree more on Matz. From 2017 through 2019 his results have been almost identical to Vargas, with Vargas beating Matz on FIP for those three years and for this year as of about two weeks ago.

      Any review of contenders’ pitching staffs shows that Matz would barely make the rotation of many of them. His 2019 FIP was over 4.55 before today’s game. Going by most starts, the Dodgers’ starting 5’s FIP are all below 4.02. Even Rich Hill, their 6th best by FIP, at 4.30 is better than Matz. I think Matz would only be as high as 4th on the Cards, while his ERA among starters there would be 5th. His FIP would be tied for 5th-6th on the Braves. Plus he has to be debited for barely going 5 innings per start.

      But the Mets have been pretending he’s still 3rd-4th material for years, as if it was still 2016 when Matz threw his good 132 innings, and they might pretend for 2020 he’s as high as 3rd if they deal Syndergaard. That bodes very poorly for next year. He’s still cheap so look for the FO to talk him up and talk about this season as “a step forward.” The usual nonsense, in short.

      Overall they should have kept Vargas and probably put him in the 5th-6th slot next year with Matz in the bullpen as the better option there of the two, as a barely adequate long man, 6th starter, and lefty out of the pen. A real contender, though, wouldn’t even want either of them in the rotation. They’d be the 6th-7th starters and clearly better pen options than many the Mets have gone through this season. If you have Vargas and Matz in your bullpen, you don’t have to make a fool of yourself by trading for someone like Wilmer Font in early May–who, by the way, left the Mets for Toronto and promptly became a much better pitcher. Font would have been the second or third best reliever on the Mets, based on his time in Toronto, which sensibly used him as a 2 inning guy.

      You’d never know Mickey Callaway was a pitching coach–not by the results he’s getting.

      1. Blair M. Schirmer says:

        Speaking of Frazier, as a Wags client, will he be back on something like a 1/10 or 2/15 deal? If the Mets sign him they can pretend they’re covered in the OF in 2020 with McNeil, Nimmo, and Conforto, Davis as the emergency 1B and 3B and the occasional LFer; Smith plays some OF, and they pick up a spare part, a glove guy for CF, and go to war with about 3 LFers and no CFer who can actually hit, leaving them destitute if Nimmo gets hurt again. Sounds like a likely scenario.

        What’s the alternative? They can’t pretend Davis is a starting 3Bman, can they? A smart team would ask him very politely to go to defense camp to learn 3B, but even so he’s not going to hit like this next year. Meanwhile, Cano should probably never again face a LH pitcher, which moves McNeil to 2B for about 40 games. I suppose they can pretend McNeil’s a 3Bman, get Davis and Smith into LF for most games, pull them for defense (if they can find a backup IF who can make the long throw from third and move McNeil to LF) or move McNeil to 2B when Cano has to be pulled from games, put Hech v. 2020 at 3B, put Nimmo in LF, and their CFer with the .600 OPS in center. Ugh. And never mind how it’s going to look in July after some injuries hit and Syracuse is once again barren.

        “Whoops, did we forget to get a AAA CFer again? Shoot. What’s Kirk Niewenhuis doing?”

        1. metsdaddy says:

          Frazier will be gone, and we’ll have a winter of Lowrie is coming back stories.

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