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Gsellman And Montero Were Used In Pivotal Spots

For the past seven games, the Mets have found new and interesting ways to lose. Today, it was a tried and true method for this team. Not getting hits with RISP and some truly bizarre managerial decisions from Terry Collins

Like most of the games on this road trip, things started well for the Mets. Michael Conforto, who Collins has spent the better part of two years telling us can’t hit lefties, hit a two run homer off Patrick Corbin to give the Mets a 2-0 first inning lead.  

From that point forward, the Mets would go 1-6 with RISP. 

Matt Harvey would give up that lead. In the first, he allowed a lead-off triple to Rey Fuentes. Fuentes then scored on a Chris Owings ground-out. In the third, Harvey allowed an opposite field two run homer off the bat of Jake Lamb
It was all part of a maddening start by Harvey. He did not have one 1-2-3 inning. He walked four batters including the opposing pitcher. He allowed his 11th homer of the season. He needed 95 pitches to get through 5.1 innings. 

And yet, there were positive signs. He didn’t allow a hit with RISP. He had big strikeouts of Paul Goldschmidt and Yasmany Tomas. He left the game in line for the win. 

The Mets had a 4-3 lead when Harvey departed. The additional two runs came in the fourth. Juan Lagares hit a long home run to tie the score at three. Matt Reynolds followed with a walk, and he would score on a Jose Reyes RBI double. As we know, the Mets wouldn’t win this one. 

For some reason, Collins went to Robert Gsellman and his 7.07 ERA to pitch the seventh. This is the same Gsellman the Mets have just removed from the rotation for the next couple of weeks. Depending on the ETA of Steven Matz and/or Seth Lugo, Gsellman may not start another game this year. Despite this, Collins felt Gsellman was the right man to protect a one run lead to help the Mets break a six game losing streak. 

Gsellman would walk Goldschmidt, and he would score on a Tomas RBI double. Just like that, the score was tied. 

The Mets would mount subsequent rallies to try to get another lead. In the eighth, there were runners on first and second with two outs, and Lagares grounded out. In the eleventh, the Mets had the same situation, and Reyes struck out. That would be the Mets last chance. 

The real part of the Mets bullpen had done a good job. Josh Edgin got Harvey out of the sixth unscathed. Jerry Blevins (8)and Addison Reed (9 & 10) pitched perfect innings to get the Mets to the 11th. At that point, Collins did the complete opposite of what he should have done. 

He brought in Rafael Montero. Not the red hot Paul Sewald. Not Fernando Salas who has been better of late. Not Neil Ramirez who the Mets signed to help the bullpen. No, he brought in Montero, and his rationale was absurd:

First batter Montero faced was Chris Herrmann. Herrmann is a career .207/.277/.338 hitter who entered the game hitting .160/.250/.280.  He injured his hand in this game. Naturally, he did this:

To recap, Collins brought in a guy with a 7.07 ERA to preserve a one run lead, and he used a guy with a 9.00 ERA to keep the game scoreless. At this point, you have to wonder if he’s trying to get fired. 

Game Notes: Reyes tried to go to second on a play in the second on a throw to the cut-off man. The play wasn’t even close, and it killed what could have been a big rally. 

4 thoughts on “Gsellman And Montero Were Used In Pivotal Spots”

  1. Gothamist says:

    Winnng pinch hitters swing at the first pitch in the strike zone and winner relievers do not get behind 2-0.

    Winning relievers can spot at least one pitch (they usual do not have four or five) they execute on the first pitch around the peripheral of the strike zone, never offer anything juicy, they set up their slider and do not throw it first pitch with timidity off the plate for a ball.

    Gsellman can learn from Harvey’s strike outs of Goldschmit but he must do it as Harvey did it.

    Let Gsellman work that into habit in the pen, do the opposite of Montero and be aggressive, work every batter like extra innings bases juiced, succeed, make habits and ONLY then move him back as a starter.

    The only hope for Montero is to pitch way inside, only do this when Travis is not playing, give a heads up to the infielders that eventually there will be hit batsmen.

    HAVE A FREAKIN PLAN!!!

    WE FREAKING KNOW THAT SOME TUMBLING CAN WEAR OFF ON EVERYONE, STATEBOF SIEGE AND THEY WILL BECOME MUCH MORE COHESIVE AS A UNIT, EMOTIONAL THE BENCH AND INFIELDERS BACK UP EVERY PITCHER, EVERY RETALIATORY HBP, AND MAYBE THE STARTERS WILL PITCH INSIDE ALSO!!!!!

    Hey, Lucas Duda was SO OBVIOUSLY to the thousanth power wonderless on the Wonderlic, I did not score like NFL’s Pat McAnally or former Jet Mike Fitzgerald… but studying history aint hard..

    WATCH THE TAPES OF PREVIOUS PENNANT WINNERS….

    THROW THE BALL INSIDE
    THESE GUYS GET INJURED ANYWAY!!!!!
    Designate which players will restrain the other team.
    Keep others away, have them plan who to peer off with where they will not have an altercation

    I am not suggesting throwing at anyone….

    If you do it?
    But wait until the four man bench becones five or six…

    Holy cow!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Sandy, even if they do it this year alone they do not have to do it once next year.
    The effect is in place on opposing teams, the cohesion of the batters having the pitchers backs and pitchers backing the batters is Huge!

    Enough of playing like gentlemen and enough playing and avoiding confortatuon….

    REMEMBER WHEN ATLANTA AND MIAMI INTENTIONALLY DRILLED CESPESDES IN 2015??

    If you can’t spot your pitches then throw inside!!!!!!!!!!

    1. metsdaddy says:

      I’m still surprised how little this team throws inside

  2. Gothamist says:

    The Met pitching is last in the MLB…. 29/29

    Yet here they are 16 and way ahead of the Big Market White Sox:
    http://scorecenter.espn.go.com/mlb/attendance?sort=allAvg

  3. Gothamist says:

    “Multiple people familiar with the Mets’ operation — most of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity — say the team has a less-than-optimal command structure that allows routine problems to fester until they become major conflagrations. Too often, the Mets’ approach leads to communication breakdowns, mixed signals or a lack of trust between the team and its players.

    “It’s the same old, same old mistakes,” one industry source said. “The Mets are a successful, profitable organization. But no organization, over a protracted period of time, has more significant players on the disabled list. There’s a failing across the board. And what changes have been instituted, if any?”

    The media guide resumes are impressive enough. Head athletic trainer Ray Ramirez has 25 years of experience in the majors with the Mets and Texas Rangers and nine seasons in the minors before that. Dr. David Altchek, the Mets’ medical director, is a respected surgeon whose New York office is on a short list with Dr. James Andrews and Dr. Neal ElAttrache as a go-to destination for pitchers with arm injuries.

    But Altchek, with his busy practice at the Hospital for Special Surgery, is not a regular presence at Citi Field. And Barwis, the top strength and conditioning employee, works out of an office in Port St. Lucie, Florida, and is primarily responsible for training players in the offseason.

    “Ultimately, these areas of expertise and coordination fall under my responsibility. It’s not Jeff or Dr. Altchek or Mike Barwis. Whether it’s coordination, or we’re sending guys to the right rehab facility, or we have the right people visiting players in the offseason, this is all my responsibility.”
    General manager Sandy Alderson
    So who’s in charge? Multiple sources said the lack of a single medical point person allows for greater involvement by COO Jeff Wilpon in areas where he’s lacking in professional expertise. They describe Wilpon as a micromanager who creates an environment in which the Mets simply whipsaw from one crisis to the next and are too often governed by how their decisions will be publicly perceived.

    “Jeff gets in the middle of everything that’s going on, and he ends up doing more damage,” said a person who has been involved in the Mets’ internal operation. “He meddles. I can’t come up with a more appropriate term.”

    http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/19404194/new-york-mets-injury-issues-go-far-disabled-list

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