menu

Mets Not Letting Corey Oswalt Succeed

Last night, Corey Oswalt was thrust into action, and well, he was terrible. In addition to allowing two inherited runners from Rick Porcello to score, he allowed five runs over four innings. He was sent down after that poor performance.

Looking at Oswalt’s career, it’s difficult to say last night was surprising. After all, over the last two years, he has made 12 starts and seven relief appearances with uninspiring results. Overall, he was 3-4 with a 6.43 ERA and 1.458 WHIP.

There’s nothing there which would suggest last night was a fluke. In fact, last night wasn’t a fluke. Really, last night was a microcosm of why Oswalt has struggled so mightily in his Major League career.

Even if the Mets would not officially confirm it, Oswalt was slated to be the Mets fifth starter. He was supposed to be preparing for a Tuesday start against the Boston Red Sox.

Instead, Oswalt was rushing to warm up to relieve and bail out Porcello. Luis Rojas could have used an actual relief pitcher to get the Mets out of the inning and then switch to Oswalt. He also could’ve gone to Paul Sewald, who has experience entering a game with runner on and giving the Mets multiple innings.

Instead, Oswalt was rushed to warm up and again put in a position to fail. This has been the story of Oswalt’s brief MLB career.

We have seen Oswalt flown cross country and make relief appearances on fewer than three days rest. We’ve seen him sit for weeks unused. He’d been shuttled back-and-forth between Triple-A and the majors and shuffled between the rotation and bullpen.

No pitcher can develop, thrive, and succeed under these circumstances. It’s simply bizarre the Mets continue to do this with Oswalt and expect different results. If this was any team other than the Mets, you’d be shocked a team would treat a prospect this way.

When you look at his career, he really only had one almost normal stretch of starts in the Majors. From July 4 – August 16, he made seven starts (plus an additional one in Triple-A), and he was 2-1 with a 4.26 ERA while averaging 5.1 innings per start.

When you take out his first poor start, which came on the heels of his being unused for over a week, Oswalt was 2-1 with a 4.24 ERA while averaging 5.2 innings per start.

No, these are not great numbers. However, these numbers show the then 24 year old rookie had the ability to pitch at the Major League level. With some time to develop, he could’ve improved and maybe emerged to be more than the fifth starter he appeared to be.

Maybe not. Fact is, we don’t and can’t know. The biggest reason why is the Mets absolutely refuse to put Oswalt in a position where he can succeed. Somehow that includes this year for a team with no starting pitching depth. It’s just ponderous.

Hopefully, at some point someone will present Oswalt with a chance to succeed. When he gets that chance, he may well prove everyone who says he can’t succeed wrong, very wrong. For that to happen, it may have to happen with a different organization, one who believes in helping all of their pitchers succeed.

6 thoughts on “Mets Not Letting Corey Oswalt Succeed”

  1. Dave G. says:

    Oswalt’s a spot starter and a swing man. Last night is exactly the spot he needs to get used or you tax your pen for several days. It’s part of the gig and if he has the skills, he’d succeed.

    Peterson should’ve been the choice for Tuesday in the first place. It’s probably a blessing in disguise.

    1. metsdaddy says:

      No, Oswalt was the fifth starter

  2. Oldbackstop says:

    Oswalt sucks. He hasn’t earned a true starting role, you say that. What does that leave? Spot starts and relief emergencies. And he still sucks. Poor baby, not enough time off and not enough warmups and having to come in with men on base. That is what happens when you suck. It is a kindness for the Mets to keep giving him shots. Sorry if it isn’t Sunday at home against the Marlins on seven days rest.

    1. metsdaddy says:

      The Mets didn’t have a better option for fifth starter

      1. Oldbackstop says:

        They don’t have a worse one. Let’s Peyerson get out there. Oswalt, by the way, turns 27 soon. If he were 23 I might agree with more kid gloves and lemon cookies. But he looks like a AAA lifer at best.

        1. metsdaddy says:

          Oswalt was the right choice for several reasons. Instead, the Mets couldn’t help themselves and instead opted to mess with Oswalt and the rotation

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *