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Mets SAVED Money On Yoenis Cespedes Contract

No one knows what happened on that farm when the rehabbing Yoenis Cespedes broke his ankle. The only thing we do know is the Mets didn’t pay him in 2019, and now, we know Cespedes won’t receive his full $29.5 million salary for either season.

Under the terms of the settlement, Cespedes will receive a little more than half of his 2019 salary. In 2020, he’s going to earn far less than that.

In fact, Cespedes is going to make roughly $20 million less with his 2020 salary reportedly going under $10 million. With unspecified incentives, it could go to $20 million, but it’ll never get back up to that $29.5 million mark.

Suddenly, Mets fans are hopeful this means the Mets could start spending and adding key bullpen pieces like Dellin Betances. Of course, this makes a dangerous presumption.

When looking at Cespedes’ restructured deal, they’re saving roughly $20 million this year before incentives. If those incentives are achieved, it would be mitigated by his 2019 savings. That $20 million should sound awfully familiar.

Rick Porcello signed a one year $10 million deal. While Michael Wacha signed a one year $3 million deal, he could earn up to $10 million. As noted by Tim Britton of The Athletic, for budget purposes, they treat those incentives as part of the payroll as if they’re definitively going to be paid.

It’s not just that way with incentives. They do that with everything. For years, they pocketed and did not reinvest the money saved on David Wright‘s deal.

Look at last year, the team didn’t reinvest the savings on Wright’s or Cespedes’ insurance money. After adding Marcus Stroman, they traded Jason Vargas to clear his contract. That’s not acting like a team who was not only not paying Cespedes, but it’s also not acting like an “all-in” team trying to grab the second Wild Card.

Going back to this offseason, no one can be quite sure what the Mets will be willing to spend. What we do know is the team’s history of not reinvesting “found money” like the restructured Cespedes deal presents. We also know there are pervasive rumors about the Mets need to move either Jed Lowrie‘s or Jeurys Familia‘s contract in order to add more players.

We don’t know if that was a position they took prior to this settlement. We also don’t know if it’s a genuine need. We also don’t know about the intent to reinvest the money in the event the Mets can move a contract.

At the moment, all we know is the Mets have saved tens of millions of dollars on Cespedes contract just like they had with Wright. They never reinvested Wright’s money or other money for that matter. While the Mets may choose to reinvest the money on Cespedes’ contract, no one should believe it until they see it.

16 thoughts on “Mets SAVED Money On Yoenis Cespedes Contract”

  1. Oldbackstop says:

    Maybe they spent the various insurance payoffs on deGrom. Or Ramos. Or Justin Wilson. Or Familia. Or Cano. Or arbing players they might have released. Or Panik. Or Lowrie. Or expanding analytics. Or Porcello. Or Wacka. Or Bach.

    As usual, you have no idea what you are talking about.

    By the way, what did those insurance premiums cost?

    You have no idea? Oh.

    Are they paying insurance premiums for deGrom’s contract? Did Cano’s contract come with insurance? Are they paying insurance premiums on Ramos’ contract?

    You are acting like there is a set budget and there is “found money” when a deal goes down. The Mets have wheeled and dealed every trading deadline dumping contracts or bringing in players (like Cespedes). The payroll has always been very reactive to their success or failure. They didn’t say “we had a hard number of $150 million, we got $10 million in an insurance payment, screw the team, let’s buy a yacht!”

    You need to get some business education and then re-launch this blog. You write at a lemonade stand level of business knowledge.

    1. metsdaddy says:

      So, you’re defending having the 19th ranked payroll?

      That’s the position you really want to take?

  2. Oldbackstop says:

    Oh, I’m sure you will also *publicly apologize* for saying this last May:
    ‐———
    “2. Van Wagenen fled Miami before the series was over and was not present to answer one question about the team he built or their play. That’s absolute cowardice.
    ‐———–

    It transpires what actually happened that day is the Brodie flew to Cespedes ranch where he got injured. What conversation transpired is unknown, but apparently with some class, discretion and a minimum of drama, Brodie saved the team about $20 million by taking a hard line with his former client over his actions.

    Was such “cowardice”, huh? Kind of like….class, integrity, and stern action.

    But you wanted a press conference over the team’s slump. And you can need to go rewrite practically all your budgetary “Expert Analysis” since you had no idea of the actual circumstances.

    1. metsdaddy says:

      Please continue to troll me while enjoying all of this non-postseason baseball.

      Clearly, it’s me and not the ineptly run Mets who are wrong.

  3. Blair M. Schirmer says:

    “In fact, Cespedes is going to make roughly $20 million less with his 2020 salary reportedly going under $10 million. With unspecified incentives, it could go to $20 million, but it’ll never get back up to that $29.5 million mark. Suddenly, Mets fans are hopeful this means the Mets could start spending and…”

    —-My expectation is that the Mets were well aware a settlement was impending (corporate lawyers are rarely surprised that settlements are likely, nor by the amounts involved, and they would have been in negotiations with Cespedes’ lawyers since the accident) and went ahead and spent the money they were all but certain to save. Meaning that for the xth offseason in a row they’ve chosen *not* to get or re-sign very good to premium players like Grandal, Cain, Wheeler, Bumgarner… and instead are filling in some improbably arrived at checklist with “depth” signings when their frontline talent at a given position isn’t actually any good. In this case that’s the 5th starter slot that they could have filled with 1 very good pitcher for the money spent, and instead got two very iffy guys.

    Here we go again, in short. What are we up to–about 84 wins for 2020?

    This is a team with enough frontline talent that it isn’t too far away from being a contender, but it needed to add two premium players while filling in cleverly at the margins. Instead, it added no such players, and is filling in abominably at the margins, to the point where Syracuse will probably be as much of a joke as it was last season.

    1. Oldbackstop says:

      Brodie says the Mets, with their full projected analysis, thought Wheeler wasn’t worth the near or long term value of the contracts he was being offered in a skinny FA market.

      They know more than any of us. I’ll await a read on this in 4 or 5 years.

      1. metsdaddy says:

        The man who knows more than any of us traded away Kelenic and Dunn for Cano and Diaz

      2. Blair M. Schirmer says:

        @Oldbackstop — “They know more than any of us.”

        We’re talking about the Wilpons, mostly Jeff, and the agent, who has no contender for ‘worst GM in the game.’ I mean, c’mon.

        1. metsdaddy says:

          Exactly

  4. Oldbackstop says:

    I think the off season is far from over. The statements by BVM mocked by MD are simply “The Art Of The Deal”…giving nothing to your adversary to think you are desperate. We don’t need a catcher, bullpen arms, a stud CF, or a blockbuster SP. Of course they do. Admitting it would kill any ability to actually do so. Brodie is a smart guy.

    I think the Mets are poised for another rise in wins, which is all you can expect from a GN.He is plus 8, I think the 2020 Mets will win over 90, and should be in the running well into September.

    Sorry, look at history…you don’t go from 75 wins to 100 in three seasons. It has happened like…almost never…

    It would be nice if the Wilpons were a top 3 spending club. They aren’t. They should be, given market. They aren’t. It would be nice. They aren’t. I hope they sell. Maybe they are.

    1. metsdaddy says:

      Yes, his statements that he added three arms to the bullpen who were already in the bullpen will certainly put him in an advantageous position when dealing with his adversaries like the Braves, Nationals, and Phillies.

      And yes, teams who get worse in the offseason win more games than they did the preceding year.

      1. Oldbackstop says:

        “Yes, his statements that he added three arms to the bullpen who were already in the bullpen will certainly put him in an advantageous position when dealing with his adversaries like the Braves, Nationals, and Phillies.”
        ‐‐———

        Omigod, are you going to get over this? The one day he is saying Lugo and Gsellman might have to be in the starter mix. The next he has Porcello.

        Do you understand th hat when he is negotiating and shopping for a bullpen arm, he shouldn’t appear to be doing so from a position of weakness and need? Do you get that it is always better to appear willing and able to walk away?

        Have you ever bought a big ticket item?

        1. metsdaddy says:

          I have, and I don’t come home with the same car proclaiming I have a new and improved car.

          I guess you would.

          1. Oldbackstop says:

            Did you walk in and the salesman thought you had walked there and were desperate for a cqr?

  5. Oldbackstop says:

    You managed to troll Brodie again, only this time without mentioning his name EVEN ONCE.

    The guy flies directly to Yo-c’s ranch, confronts him, and gets 20 million bucks. Without the usual NY media drama that accompanies every little Met development.

    Great job Brodie!

    1. metsdaddy says:

      Jokes should be funnier than this

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