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Wheeler’s Injury A Reason To Stand Pat At The Trade Deadline

With Zack Wheeler on the Injured List, and his being unsure as to when he can return, the Mets biggest trade chip has now been compromised. As a result, a player who could have fetched one or possible two very good prospects may not fetch nearly the same level of return. This leaves the Mets organization pondering what to do with Wheeler and really all of their trade assets.

Working backwards a bit, Wheeler is not the only expiring contract the Mets have. There is Juan Lagares, who really has zero value on the trade market between his contract and his regression both offensively and defensively. After him is Jason Vargas, who has failed to go at least five innings in 40 percent of his starts. Vargas also threatened to attack a reporter, and he has had a 5.94 ERA since the incident. That in mind, it’s unlikely he has any value on the trade market.

Todd Frazier is having a nice season, but again, you wonder what his market will be. To put things in perspective, in 2017, he was traded by the White Sox to the Yankees for a package including Ian Clarkin, Tito Polo, Blake Rutherford, and Tyler Clippard. Rutherford was a really good get for the White Sox, but that was mostly because they were trading Tommy Kahnle in the deal. Kahnle had been a very good reliever for a year plus, and he was under team control for four plus years.

For the Mets to get a similar return for Frazier, they would have to package him with an Edwin Diaz or a Seth Lugo. Based upon reports, the Mets are not interested in doing that, and you could understand that with the Mets having a young core still intact. It is also a reason the Mets are not looking to move Noah Syndergaard. As a result, the Mets really do not have any good trade chips; at least trade chips which will return anything more than the collection of right-handed relievers they received when they previously traded Addison Reed, Lucas Duda, and Jay Bruce.

Looking deeper, the Mets are “only” five games (four in the loss) out of the second Wild Card. At the moment, it is noticeable how the teams in front of them have done almost nothing to get going and really stake a claim to being a front runner for one of the two Wild Card spots. This is not too dissimilar from what we saw in 2016 where the Mets went from two games under .500 on August 19 to finish the season on a 27-13 tear to claim the top Wild Card spot.

Believe it or not, the Mets schedule actually does set up for another run like this. After today’s game against the White Sox, the Mets have 20 straight games against teams with a losing record. After that, they have a set at home against the Nationals, a team who currently has the top Wild Card spot.

That’s an incredible 23 game opportunity for the Mets to go on a real run up the Wild Card standings. This could be a team which could take full advantage of that opportunity because as Syndergaard said in 2016, the Mets are a second half team.

Wheeler has always been a strong second half pitcher. Same goes for Syndergaard whose career second half ERA is 38 points lower. Jacob deGrom has a better second half WHIP, K/9, and K/BB. In addition to the starters, we should expect to see a much better bullpen with the return of Justin Wilson. In fact, we have so far with the Mets bullpen ERA being 3.86 in July, which is 11th best in the majors and significantly better than the almost impossibly bad 7.53 June bullpen ERA.

There’s also the Amed Rosario factor. Over the past month, he is hitting .342/.365/.468 indicating he may be poised for a second half breakout. Very quietly, he has started to play better defense. In fact, since the All-Star Break, he is actually a 2 DRS. It’s a small sample size for sure, but it’s a positive development.

When you also consider how Michael Conforto and Robinson Cano are better hitters in the second half, you see a glimmer of hope. Speaking of Cano, with him and Edwin Diaz, you have to believe their second halves have to be better than their first.

Is this enough for the Mets to go out and buy? No, not even close. According to Fangraphs, the Mets postseason odds stand at 7.6 percent. Those are nearly insurmountable odds. However, that does not mean the Mets should go selling their players for little to no return when the schedule does set up favorably for them.

In the end, this is really about Wheeler. If he was healthy, the Mets could have received a significant return for him. If his IL stint changes things, it would behoove the Mets to offer him a qualifying offer at the end of the season and just let things ride with this team. After all, there is still a chance.

4 thoughts on “Wheeler’s Injury A Reason To Stand Pat At The Trade Deadline”

  1. OldBackstop says:

    Standing pat would be the stupidest thing the Mets could do., given the tightening on August rules.

    They have to add a speedy outfielder and a long man/spot reliever at least to bother thinking wildcard. And if not, they should dump Frazier, Vagares, Gsellman, Ramops on anyone they can. get a little sumpin sumpin..

    Fate being decided tonight and the next week on that…..

    1. Blair M. Schirmer says:

      It’s true that the Mets have only a trivial chance of making the postseason, and have at best a 50-50 chance of even getting past the wild card. In any case it hardly matters. Teams with big holes in the rotation, a below average lineup, and a terrible bullpen don’t make the modern postseason. There are too many contenders across the entire league for just two wildcard slots.

      I get the point. If you have to keep Wheeler you might as well hope he’ll come back and you can try to go for it, but for one thing Wheeler has had poor results this season, and going for the tiny chance you’ll even make the wildcard playoff means giving up the chance to get something for the few sellable players you do have on hand.

      That’s not a chance a team with a well below average farm can afford to take. The team threw away a lot of good money this offseason. Time to pull back what they still can. In poker, we call continuing to throw money into the pot as the odds get longer and longer “chasing.” This would be chasing.

      1. metsdaddy says:

        It’s not chasing when you’re already all-in. Seriously, you’re not getting anything of value in return.

    2. metsdaddy says:

      No, standing pat is the right thing to do as you’re getting nothing of value in return.

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