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If Mets Fire Mickey Callaway, Luis Rojas Should Be His Replacement

When Jim Riggleman was hired as the bench coach this past offseason, the running joke was the Mets hired their interim manager. With the Mets faltering, Mickey Callaway‘s seat grows hotter by the day, and it would appear this is less of a joke than it is becoming a reality. Or is it?

According to Mike Puma of the NY Post, in the event Callaway was fired, the organization would consider hiring Luis Rojas as they view him “as a rising star.”

Not only is Rojas a rising star, baseball runs through his veins. From the moment he was born, baseball encapsulated his entire life. This is the way things are when you grow up in country like the Dominican Republic. It’s also that way when your father is famed player and manager Felipe Alou, and your brother is Moises Alou. Taking a look at the bloodlines, you could almost see being a Major League manager as Rojas’ destiny.

For his part, Rojas believed this upbringing has influenced not just his career choice but also his views. Rojas would tell Anthony Dicomo of MLB.com, “Growing up in that environment was very impactful, very influential in my baseball growth. Just being born in a baseball atmosphere, right away opening my eyes on baseball from the beginning of my understanding was just really helpful. Right away, I wanted to follow my brothers’ steps. I wanted to follow the family’s steps.”

Obviously, Rojas was never the baseball player he brother was. From 1999 – 2005, he was a part of the Orioles, Marlins, and eventually Expos farm systems. He’d play 37 games for the Expos Gulf Coast League affiliate in 2004 hitting .240/.315/.352. Two years later, Rojas would begin his managerial career for the Expos Dominican Summer League team.

After that one season, the Mets jumped on Rojas, and they made him their DSL Manager for one season. The team then brought him stateside to serve as a coach for two years in the Gulf Coast League. Finally, in 2011, at the age of 29, Rojas would be named the manager of that same affiliate. From that point until this year, Rojas has been a manager in the Mets farm system.

During his time as a manager in the Mets system, he has managed a number of Mets prospects including current Mets Pete Alonso, Tyler Bashlor, Michael Conforto, Jacob deGrom, Drew Gagnon, Robert Gsellman, Seth Lugo, Steven Matz, Brandon Nimmo, Jeff McNeil, Amed Rosario, Dominic Smith, Amed Rosario, and Daniel Zamora. Put another way, Rojas has helped develop the current Mets core become not just Major League players, but in some instances, All-Star caliber players.

He’s certainly left an impression on each of these players. When hired, Alonso shared a story about Rojas’ enthusiasm for his players saying, “He was jumping up and down, arms waving in the air. I honestly think Luis was happier than [Nick Sergakis].”

But it’s more than enthusiasm and relationships, Rojas can coach. It’s one of the reasons why the Mets see him as a rising star and why they were so enthusiastic to name him the team’s first ever quality control coach. In addition to those duties, he is also the team’s outfield coach.

We are seeing his impact as an outfield coach right now. Entering this season, McNeil had played all of 26.1 innings in left field over a six year span. It was up to Rojas to get McNeil up to speed. As he explained, Rojas’ plan was to begin “with the basics: pre-pitch, stance, route, reads off the bat and we progress into other things that we are taking here into camp and then some of the drills that we bring in with some of the outfielders.” (NY Post).

With Rojas coaching McNeil, McNeil has quickly become good in the outfield with a 2 DRS, which is sixth best in the league. It’s also important to note when Conforto was drafted, the knock on him was his defense. He worked with Rojas on his defense, and he has been really good out there. Now that he’s reunited with Rojas, Conforto has a 3 DRS which is good for sixth best in the majors.Credit is due to the players, but they got to that point because they are working with an excellent coach.

Rojas is not just a coach who is able to connect with this players, he is also comfortable not just with analyzing advanced data, but also putting it in terms which are useful to the players. As noted by MMO‘s Michael Mayer, it is Rojas’ responsibility to streamline the data to the players.

While comparisons of this nature tend to be unfairly lofty, in some ways Rojas does remind you of Alex Cora. Rojas has shown the ability to understand not just the fundamental aspects of the game, but he is also well versed and comfortable handling analytical data. He is an excellent communicator and coach. He loves the game, and he loves his players.

Whenever the time comes, Rojas should prove to be a good manager for the Mets. He is everything an organization and its players want in a manager. Being the communicator he is, he should also be able to handle the press well. Hopefully, another team doesn’t realize what the Mets have in Rojas and grab him before the time the Mets have a chance to elevate him into the manager’s role he was destined to be seemingly since the day he was born.

 

7 thoughts on “If Mets Fire Mickey Callaway, Luis Rojas Should Be His Replacement”

  1. Gothamist says:

    Sounds like you definitively believe he should be fired.

    And what if they fire him:

    Which players are long term successful assets in their prime years that he can get back on their feet, be better leaders, better teammates, get their nerve and great tools to throw more shutout relief, 8th inning doubles against Milwaukee, steal bases, walk more, and for so many — K far less?

    What if there is little upside w this roster?

    What if the farm system has little to offer for awhile ?

    What if they pay Cano snd Cespedes $50 m not only for next to nothing ?

    What is your next move?

    What if Dave Eiland wants out and you go from two pitching coaches who won three world series games — to none?

    That Noah and Zach are fed up?

    1. metsdaddy says:

      Honestly, I don’t want to see him fired. I’ve seen improvement, and I’ve seen his players not quit on him. Also, he comes with Eiland.

  2. Oldbackstop says:

    Omigod….we need another first time manager? Really? That has worked well. Let’s get someone that has made out a major league lineup fer Chrisake. Let’s not give the Wilsons a scapegoat.

    1. metsdaddy says:

      So Rojas isn’t qualified or good because the Mets hired Callaway after one interview despite his never having managed a game in his life?

      1. Oldbackstop says:

        The issue is this….if Callaway gets canned, and Rojas comes in, he is an obvious interim manager. If Rojas comes in, he will be viewed as a strong candidate next year, with all the resultant drama.

        I know you prioritize finding a manager for 3 years 2.4 mil, rather than 3/6.0, like the Wilsons, but why not get an established veteran proven manager? That is one excuse to cross off the Wilsons excuse/scapegoat list. Let a small market club give some guy with two months in the majors their skipper job.

        1. metsdaddy says:

          This is complaining for its own sake. If Rojas is qualified and does well, why shouldn’t he get the job?

          1. Oldbackstop says:

            Because he is not an established major league veteran manager.

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