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Mets All-In Roster Is Approximately $130 Million

While the Mets were trying to sell us under Brodie Van Wagenen this was a new team where anything was possible. As the offseason progresses, we once again learn anything being possible doesn’t include the Mets spending money.

Here’s a look at their current payroll commitments:

Catchers

Wilson Ramos $7.25 million

Travis d’Arnaud $3.52 million

Subtotal: $10.77 million

Infielders

Robinson Cano $20 million (estimated)

Todd Frazier $9 million

Amed Rosario $560k*

Peter Alonso $560k

Jeff McNeil $560k

J.D. Davis $560k

Subtotal: $31.24 million

Outfielders

Juan Lagares $9 million

Brandon Nimmo $560k

Keon Broxton $560k

Subtotal: $10.12 million

Starting Rotation

Jason Vargas $8 million

Bullpen

Edwin Diaz $560k

Jeurys Familia $6.66 million

Seth Lugo $560k

Robert Gsellman $560k

Daniel Zamora $560k

Subtotal: $8.9 million

Arbitration Estimates

(Estimates from MLB Trade Rumors)

Jacob deGrom $12.9 million

Noah Syndergaard $5.9 million

Zack Wheeler $5.3 million

Michael Conforto $4.4 million

Steven Matz $3.0 million

Subtotal: $31.5 million

That’s $100.53 million wrapped up in 22 players who will likely take the field for the Mets next season.

When you include Yoenis Cespedes‘ $29 million, the payroll jumps to $129.53 million. That’s $129.53 million with three spots which need to be filled on this roster. Keep in mind this is before you account for a portion of his salary being covered by insurance.

If Hector Santiago makes the Opening Day roster, he’s due $2 million. That’s one fewer roster spot to have to fill, and it raises the payroll to $131.53 million.

That leaves the Mets looking for a utility player who can play SS and one more bullpen arm. Judging from reports, the Mets aren’t going out to get their guy, but rather they’re waiting for a deal for that last bullpen arm.

Where the Mets go from there, we don’t know. What we do know is the Mets are only spending $131.53 million on the players who will play next year.

As for shortstop, we can’t rule out players like Gavin Cecchini, Luis Guillorme, or T.J. Rivera getting that chance, which would push payroll towards an uninspiring $132 million.

Yes, someone will likely raise David Wright and the fact he is owed $15 million next year. Well, fact is he’s been released, and we do not know if there’s been any settlement with the insurance company, Wright, or both. We may have some evidence to what that may be:

But Wright is also a non sequitur. He’s not playing this year, the next, or ever again. Fact is, right now, the Mets are going to battle with a payroll of approximately $130 million. Maybe when all is said and done, it’s higher, but it’s nowhere near what a large market payroll should be.

That’s not the all-in team Mets fans were promised, and when you boil it down, the Mets really have zero excuse as to why they’re not pursuing any other outfielders or why they haven’t pursued Bryce Harper and Manny Machado.

* $560k was estimated salary for for pre-arbitration players.

15 thoughts on “Mets All-In Roster Is Approximately $130 Million”

  1. oldbackstop says:

    $130 mill – Cespedes insurance….will insurance kick into the Wright settlement? They had a dog in the fight. Also we got $20 mil with Cano to be accounted somewhere there…was that the estimated note?

    Anyway, I’m optimistic on Hector and wanted him all along. He was an all star in 2015, the year all expectations should be based upon. He is employing a new screwball. He had a 4.50 era in the AL and went 6-3 in seven starts and 42 relief appearances. 4.50 ERA might not look impressive, but it was in the AL and you can compare it to Vargas (5.77) and Oswalt (5.83) quite favorably.

    When I advocated Santiago I also said Marwin Gonzalez, who was in 39 games at SS for the Stros last year and plays every place but catcher and pitcher and with a solid bat that was extraordinary in 2017 (.903 OPS). MLBTRS estimates 4/$32. He is only 29. I can’t find a specific piece of news linking the Mets other than blanket statements that all teams have inquired.

    $8 mil for him we can afford, no?

    1. metsdaddy says:

      Marwin won’t come to the Mets to fight for ABs with McNeil. If he does come , it means he’s guaranteed a starting job, which then means Alonso is in Triple-A.

      1. oldbackstop says:

        Right, but McNeil can’t play SS (nor can Rivera, at least hasn’t since 2014 at Binghamton).
        We all love Rosario, but did you see he had a negative dWAR last year, lowest among starting NL shortstops in fact?
        Marwin plays everywhere…I could see him getting 400-500 ABs. And if he is competing with McNeil, let the games begin….I suspect McNeil’s 2018 was a little flukey anyway. It was only in 248 ABs, and he hadn’t had a slash like that since rookie ball.

        1. metsdaddy says:

          Marwin Gonzalez can’t play SS any better than Jeff McNeil could, and again, you’re asking a guy who played 140 games on a real World Series contender to fight for playing time with McNeil.

          Why does he do that?

          1. oldbackstop says:

            I haven’t seen anywhere he is demanding a given starting position. His value is his flexibility. If he says “I will only play 3rd base”, he loses the interest of 80% of the prospective clubs, and would get a lower deal.

            Maybe I’m wrong, but I haven’t seen him demanding it. I think between our old third baseman, our old second baseman, our average SS, our unsettled first base, and the whole outfield, he’d get plenty of playing time.

          2. metsdaddy says:

            I haven’t seen him demand it, but I’d imagine he’d want one if he went to a team who already had a supersub

          3. oldbackstop says:

            How could you possibly say he isn’t any better than McNeil at SS! McNeil hasn’t played it since rookie ball five years ago, Marwin played it 9 games last year for a contender! Jesus….

          4. metsdaddy says:

            And Marwin was terrible there.

          5. oldbackstop says:

            Correction, 39 games.

  2. Gothamist says:

    I want to believe that if there are one year deals to be had they would grab them however :

    A) Who are the attractive other team’s free agents in 2020?
    B) Do we see a potential add of $20m plus to the payroll just for de Grom next year?
    C) Will they let Wheeler walk?
    D) Who steps up in arbitration next year? Costs more?

    1. metsdaddy says:

      A) There are a few like Arenado, but is that something you look at when you’re trying to win now?
      B) Doubtful but not impossible
      C) Most likely, and you can blame Cano for that
      D) Lugo and Gsellman

      1. OldBackstop says:

        By what measure was Marwin worse than Rosario at SS last year? Bear in nind that Rosario had a negative dWAR of 0.9. Marwin was + 0.5 dWAR despite being put all over the place. Rosario is the starter, Marwin is a capable backup. What is your other choice? Some great glove, light hit SS who will just sit on the bench?

        1. metsdaddy says:

          Marwin was a -5 DRS last year and -8 DRS over the past two years at SS. He’s really bad there.

          As for the great glove light hitting comment, Marwin would be a light hitting no fielding SS.

  3. oldbackstop says:

    John Dewan has said many times DRS is useless in samples less than a full year. Citing it for Marwin is like saying Nido is a slugger because he had three home runs in 35 at bats (he didn’t just making up an example).

    In the full year of 2018, Rosario was -16 DRS, the worst of any qualifying NL SS. In fact, the next worse NL SS , Jordy Mercer, was only -9, The worst after that was -2, Jose Peraza.

    Rosario was a really, really bad SS this year.

    Why isn’t anyone talking about that?

    1. metsdaddy says:

      Rosario was bad at SS last year, but he’s also young and able to improve.

      With respect to Marwin, he’s over 30 and has established he can’t play SS. I’d also note on the DRS front, Marwin has consistently rated low at the position with declining numbers.

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