menu

Patrick Mahomes Could Thrive In New York Like His Father Did

Tonight is a jam packed sports night.  For Mets fans, no matter how bad things are, you are turning into the game against the Braves if for no other reason than to see Noah Syndergaard  pitch.  For Rangers fans, it is the first game of the Eastern Conference semi-finals against the Ottawa Senators and their old friend Derick Brassard.  However, as we all know the first round of the NFL Draft will get the largest share of publicity.  The NFL gets the lion share no matter what it is doing.

The NFL Draft does present someone of an intriguing possibility for Mets fans.  One of the top QB prospects in this draft is Texas Tech Patrick Mahomes.  He has quite the pedigree with him being the godson of former Mets reliever LaTroy Hawkins.  Oh, and Patrick Mahomes is the son of former Mets reliever Pat Mahomes.

Unlike his son, Mahomes wasn’t really on anyone’s radar heading into the 1999 season.  Through six major league seasons, he was 21-28 with a 5.88 ERA and a 1.627 WHIP.  After a poor 1997 season, where he was only able to pitch in 10 games for the Boston Red Sox, Mahomes found himself pitching for the Yokohama Bay Stars of the Japanese Leagues.  In his eight starts and two relief appearances, he was far from impressive going 0-4 with a 5.98 ERA and a 1.510 WHIP.  Still, Mahomes must have done something right in that stint as the Mets signed him to a minor league deal in the offseason.

With Josias Manzanillo struggling to start the year, there was an opening in the Mets bullpen in 1999.  Mahomes was called up, and he took complete advantage of his opportunity.  Mahomes became the long man in the Mets bullpen, and he thrived in that role.  While the long man in the bullpen is an overlooked role on most teams, it was vitally important to that 1999 team.

Al Leiter and Kenny Rogers were the only pitchers who averaged more than six innings pitched, and Rogers didn’t come to the Mets until July.  One of the team’s better starters, Bobby Jones, was injured leading to a revolving door of fifth starters.  Top options in Jason Isringhausen and Octavio Dotel had the talent, but they couldn’t go deep into games.  Overall, the team needed a good long man.  Mahomes was that and more.

During the season, Mahomes would make just 39 appearances, but he would pitch 63.2 innings.  It should be noted Mahomes was partially able to pitch those innings because unlike most relievers Bobby Valentine could trust him at the plate.  During the 1999 season, Mahomes was 5-16 with three doubles and three RBI.  However, we all know Valetine kept going to him because of the results Mahomes got on the mound.

In Mahomes’ 39 appearances, he had a 3.68 ERA and a 1.272 WHIP.  As a result of his terrific pitching, he finished the season with a perfect 8-0 record.  Considering it was the steroids era, those are truly impressive numbers.  Considering where he was just a season ago, they are inspiring.

Mahomes would continue pitching well into the postseason where he had a 2.25 ERA and a 1.250 WHIP in eight innings over four appearances.  Notably, Mahomes pitched four shutout innings in at epic Game 6 of the NLCS which permitted the Mets to get back into the game.  What was once unfathomable when Leiter gave up five innings in the first inning, the Mets took the lead in the seventh inning.   While the Mets did not win that game, they were in that position because Mahomes stepped up big in that spot.  That was a theme for him during the 1999 season.

So to that extent, we know that big game ability is in the Mahomes gene pool.  We also know the ability to play in New York in high pressure situations is as well.  To that end, maybe, just maybe, Patrick Mahomes would be a fine fit with either the New York Giants, as Eli Manning’s successor in waiting, or the New York Jets as the latest franchise quarterback.

The talent is there.  In a recent Peter King MMQB column, Mahomes was compared favorably to Brett Favre.  With talent like that and his background, there should be no doubt Mahomes can thrive in not just the NFL, but also in New York.  His name may not get called tonight, but it will likely get called on Friday.

Whatever the future holds for him, the best of luck to Mahomes.  His father was one of the players that made one of the most enjoyable seasons in Mets history happen.  Hopefully, wherever Mahomes lands, he can provide those fans the same joy his father provided Mets fans.  With any luck, that will be with the Giants.

5 thoughts on “Patrick Mahomes Could Thrive In New York Like His Father Did”

  1. Gothamist says:

    A a joy to read this!
    This is NYT quality journalism.
    The Mets to the Rangers, the Draft and back to Mets was the simple part.

    Thank you….

    1. metsdaddy says:

      No, thank you

  2. Gothamist says:

    Trivia

    The Mets and maybe the Nats and maybe the Braves went to the WS on a completely lopsided trade. Each team has so far has clearly achieved in the eyes of profession a “slaughter” of a deal. The opposing three GMs are no longer employed as GMs if not out of baseball completely. Maybe it is a great opportunity always for an ambitious GM to seek out these GMs in similiar unique circumstances of inexperience, limited oversight from ownership, their belief they can create playoff teams in a year or two after being well under .500.

    We know the Noah Syndergaard heist (yes R A Dickey did pitch 200+ innings on a Toronto team that went deep into the playoffs) and the impact player Noah may become for over a decade if not multiple WS appearances.

    Though it maybe a few years but the Braves “acquisitions” in their deal are already in Atlanta and starting and can be a multiple in the lineup and part of a great up the middle defense if not much more momentum in the years to come.

    It may take a few years as it took for the Mets and the Mets still have an outfielder from Toronto I believe in AA ball and if he can limit his Ks he may become a viable fourth MLB outfielder with power.

    The trivia question or inquiry is loosely structured and left to reader, writer or whomever to reply as they wish, if they wish.

    Yet, one trade msy chsnge the dividion for ten years for his impact msy change how each player approaches his ABATS almost every game for the BETTER!

    MOST MOST MOST MOST MOST

    Who was on the MLB headlines just last last night as possibly the most lopsided trade of the three, even parting with the least and getting the most, possibly having the most impact, most impact this year, impact almost every game for years to come leading to possibly the most WS appearances of the three clubs, potentially leaving the other two clubs just vying ONLY AT BEST at tops, at MOST for a playoff of a single sudden death wildcard game for years to come?

    Maybe the author of this blog will do a feature?

    1. metsdaddy says:

      Trea Turner?

  3. Gothamist says:

    Yeap

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *